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Allocasuarina torulosa

Family

Casuarinaceae

Botanical Name

Allocasuarina torulosa (Aiton) L.A.S.Johnson

Johnson, L.A.S. (1982) Journal of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens 6(1): 79. Type: ?.

Synonyms

Casuarina lugubris Salisb., Prodromus stirpium in Horto ad Chapel Allerton vigentium: 2(1796), Type: ?. Casuarina torulosa Aiton f. torulosa, Plantae Preissianae 1(4): 640(1845), Type: ?. Casuarina tortuosa A.Henry, Novorum Actorum Academiae Caesareae Leopoldino-Carolinae Naturae Curiosorum 22: 217(1847), Type: (not cited). Casuarina torulosa Aiton, Hortus Kewensis 3: 320(1789), Type: Nat of New South Wales. Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. Casuarina tenuissima Spreng., Systema Vegetabilium 3: 804(1826), Type: Nov. Holl.

Common name

River Oak; Baker's Oak; Forest Oak; Forest Sheoak; Oak, Baker's; Oak, Forest; Rose Sheoak

Stem

Oak grain very conspicuous in the wood.

Leaves

What appear to be needle-like leaves are really twigs and the true leaves (in whorls of four) are just visible to the naked eye when the needles are broken at a joint. Oak grain in the twigs.

Flowers

Male flowers: Flowers consist of scale-like perianth segments and one stamen. Female flowers: Flowers lack a perianth and the fused carpels usually enclose only two ovules.

Fruit

Cones about 20-30 x 15-20 mm. Samaras dark brown, shiny, about 7-10 mm long. Bracteoles thick and convex.

Seedlings

Cotyledons without visible veins, much larger than the leaves. First group of leaves whorled. At the tenth leaf stage: leaves minute, without visible venation, in whorls of four.

Distribution and Ecology

Endemic to Australia, occurs in an isolated pocket in CYP, widespread in NEQ and southwards as far as south-eastern New South Wales. Altitudinal range in CYP and NEQ from 40-1200 m. Usually grows in wet sclerophyll forest but also found on the margins of rain forest.

Natural History

A very useful firewood. Easy to cut and split when green, drying rapidly and burning well, producing plenty of heat.

This species produces a timber which was formerly used as roof shingles. Swain (1928).

CYP

X

NEQ

X

Shrub (woody or herbaceous, 1-6 m tall)

X

Tree

X

RFK Code

393