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Gmelina dalrympleana

Family

Lamiaceae

Botanical Name

Gmelina dalrympleana (F.Muell.) H.J.Lam

Lam, H.J. (1919) The Verbenaceae of the Malayan Archipelago: 223. Type: ?.

Synonyms

Vitex dalrympleana F.Muell., Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae 4: 128(1864), Type: In locis paludosis ad sinum Rockinghams Bay; Dallachy Holo: MEL. Vitex macrophylla R.Br., Prodromus Florae Novae Hollandiae: 512(1810), Type: B. v.s..[given by A.A.Munir, J. Adelaide Bot. Gard. 7 (1984) 109 as J. Banks & D. Solander s.n., Cape Grafton, Queensland, Australia]. Gmelina macrophylla (R.Br.) Benth., Flora Australiensis 5: 65(1870), Type: ?.

Common name

Beech; Beech, White; Grey Teak; White Beech

Stem

Blaze darkening to orange-brown on exposure. Creamy yellow flecks usually visible in the blaze.

Leaves

Leaf blades usually fairly large, about 15-30 x 7-19 cm. Two flat glands usually visible on the underside of the leaf blade near the base just before its junction with the petiole. Petiole channelled and midrib depressed on the upper surface.

Flowers

Calyx about 4-5 mm long, with nectar producing glands on the outer surface. Corolla tube about 12-13 mm long, lobes about 6-10 mm long. Ovary about 1.5-2 mm long, hairy at the apex. One stigma much longer than the other.

Fruit

Fruits obovoid, 8-18 x 5-12 mm.

Seedlings

Cotyledons obovate or oblong, apex emarginate, hairs only present at the very young stage. First few pairs of leaves toothed. At the tenth leaf stage: leaves elliptic, upper surface with a few short hairs along the midrib, teeth, if present, dentate, veins about 5-8 on each side of the midrib, midrib depressed on the upper surface.

Distribution and Ecology

Occurs in CYP and NEQ. Altitudinal range from sea level to 500 m. Grows in swampy or seasonally swampy situations in or on the margins of rain forest and monsoon forest. Also occurs in New Guinea.

Natural History

Produces a durable timber with a rather coarse grain. Fruit eaten by Fruit Pigeons. Cooper & Cooper (1994).

CYP

X

NEQ

X

Shrub (woody or herbaceous, 1-6 m tall)

X

Tree

X

RFK Code

418