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Intsia bijuga

Family

Caesalpiniaceae

Botanical Name

Intsia bijuga (Colebr.) Kuntze

Kuntze, C.E.O. (1891) Revis. Gen. Pl. 1: 192. Type: ?.

Synonyms

Afzelia bijuga (Colebr.) A.Gray, United States Exploring Expedition (Wilkes Expedition) Botany. Phanerogamia 1: 467(1854), Type: ?. Macrolobium bijugum Colebr., Trans. Linn. Soc. LOnd. 12: 359(1818), Type: Cultivated Calcutta Botanical Garden, India. Afzelia australis F.M.Bailey, A Synopsis of the Queensland Flora, Supplement 2: 19(1888), Type: Johnstone River. , Dr. Thos. L. Bancroft..

Common name

Teak; Pacific Teak; Mahogany, Scrub; Johnstone River Teak; Kwila; Scrub Mahogany

Stem

Bark often scalloped. Blaze odour resembles that of freshly shelled peas (Pisum sativum) or cut green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Minute ray pattern usually visible in the inner blaze.

Leaves

Frequently four leaflets in each compound leaf. Leaflet blades about 7-15 x 3-13 cm. Lateral veins forming a somewhat obscure series of loops inside the blade margin. Leaflet stalks somewhat swollen and transversely wrinkled. Stipules present on very young shoots.

Flowers

Only one petal fully developed, about 12 mm long, the others absent or very much reduced, resembling staminodes. Stamens, style and stigma red, anther filaments sparsely hairy. Staminodes 4-7, red. Ovary green, style about 16 mm long.

Fruit

Pods flat, about 8.5-23 x 4-8 cm. Seeds flat, about 3 x 2 cm.

Seedlings

Cotyledons +/- orbicular, about 20 mm diam., thick and fleshy, venation not visible. First pair of leaves compound, usually with four leaflets. At the tenth leaf stage: leaves usually with four leaflets, each shortly ovate and unequal-sided, apex acute, base obtuse, glabrous.

Distribution and Ecology

Occurs in NT, CYP and NEQ, normally at low elevations close to the sea. Usually grows in beach forest but also found in quite well developed rain forest. Also occurs in Madagascar, India, SE Asia, Malesia and on the Indian and the Pacific islands.

Natural History

This species produces one of the most valuable timbers in SE Asia and the SW Pacific. It is both durable and decorative and can be used in a large number of different situations.

Wood specific gravity 0.86. Cause et al. (1989).

NT

X

CYP

X

NEQ

X

Tree

X

RFK Code

413