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Trema aspera

Family

Cannabaceae

Botanical Name

Trema aspera (Brongn.) Blume

Blume, C.L. von (1856) Museum Botanicum Lugduno-Batavum 2: 58. Type: ?.

Synonyms

Sponia aspera (Brongn.) Decne., Nouvelles Annales du Museum d'Histoire Naturelle 3: 498(1834), Type: ?. Trema aspera var. typica Domin, Bibliotheca Botanica 89(4): 560(1928), Type: ?. Celtis aspera Brongn., Voy. Monde (Phan.) t. 48: 213(1834), Type: Blue Mountains near Port Jackson, NSW, R.P. Lesson & J. S. C. D. D Urville s.n. Trema aspera var. xerophila Domin, Biblioth. Bot. 89: 6(1921), Type: Chillagoe, Qld, 1910, K. Domin.

Common name

Peach Poison Bush; Elm; Fig, Rough; Kurrajong; Native Peach; Peach-leaf Poison Bush; Peach-leaved Poison Tree; Poison Peach; Rough Fig; Small Poison Peach

Stem

Seldom exceeding 30 cm dbh. Blaze odour obnoxious.

Leaves

Stipules long and narrow, gradually tapering to a fine point. Twig bark strong and fibrous, emitting an obnoxious odour when stripped. Leaf blades about 3.5-13 x 1.1-6 cm.

Flowers

Inflorescence about 0.5-1 cm long with about 30-50 flowers. Perianth lobes 1.5 x 0.5 mm, induplicate-valvate in the bud. Staminal filaments about 0.5-1 mm long. Ovary about 1 mm long, stigmatic arms spreading or incurved.

Fruit

Fruits about 3.5 x 3 mm, perianth lobes persistent at the base. Seed about 2-2.5 x 2 mm. Stone rugose. Embryo U-shaped, cotyledons much wider than the radicle.

Seedlings

Cotyledons linear-ovate or linear-obovate, about 5-8 mm long. At the tenth leaf stage: leaf blade ovate, apex acute, base obtuse or cordate, margin serrate or dentate with teeth all around the margin, upper surface clothed in +/- scabrous hairs; petiole, stem and terminal bud clothed in short, pale hairs; stipules linear-triangular, hairy.

Distribution and Ecology

Occurs in WA, NT, CYP, NEQ and southwards to Victoria. Altitudinal range from sea level to 1000 m. Grows in monsoon forest, well developed rain forest and wet sclerophyll forest. This species is favoured by disturbance. Also occurs in New Guinea.

Natural History

Field evidence indicates that this species is a very important cause of sickness and death in livestock and its toxicity has been confirmed in feeding tests. Everist (1974).

Food plant for the larval stages of the Speckled Lineblue Butterfly. Common & Waterhouse (1981).

WA

X

NT

X

CYP

X

NEQ

X

Herb (herbaceous or woody, under 1 m tall)

X

Shrub (woody or herbaceous, 1-6 m tall)

X

Tree

X

RFK Code

294